In 2013, Wednesday 13th March is No Smoking Day in the UK.

This year the theme, Swap Fags for Swag, is all about what smokers will gain when they quit – as well as improved health, they’ll have extra cash to spend on whatever they like!

Stopping smoking now could be like giving yourself a hefty pay rise – and it’s one benefit you’ll feel straight away.

a day 1 day 1 week 1 month 1 year 5 years 10 years
5 £1.75 £12.25 £52.5 £638.75 £3,193.75 £6,387.50
10 £3.50 £24.50 £105 £1,277.50 £6,387.50 £12,775
20 £7 £49 £210 £2,555 £12,775 £25,550
30 £10.50 £73.50 £315 £3,832.50 £19,162.50 £38,325
40 £14 £98 £420 £5,110 £25,550 £51,100
60 £21 £147 £630 £7,665 £38,325 £76,650

Based on average price of 20 cigarettes = £7.00

If you would like local help to quit smoking, there are several options open to you.

You can choose to self-refer to the NHS Stop Smoking Service by phoning the number for the South Central area: 0131 536 9759 (Mon-Fri 9am-5pm – answering service available out of hours).

The service itself offers several ways to help you stop smoking, allowing you to choose the one that best suits your lifestyle. These include one-to-one support, group support, self-help, NRT (Nicotine Replacement Therapy), or prescribed medication.

There is a separate number for pregnant women who would like help to stop: 0131 672 9533, young people who want to stop can text ‘Stop Smoking’ to 07969 530266, and members of the Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender community throughout Lothian can call 0131 558 9444

You can phone the practice on 0131 228 6081 to make an appointment with one of our practice nurses, who will be able to explain the various stop smoking options to you, as well as offer you motivational support and encouragement. Or if you prefer, you can also speak to your usual GP.

Support is also available from some community pharmacists, who can provide Nicotine Replacement Therapy as well as one-to-one support sessions to help you quit. The list of participating pharmacies in the South Central area is available here.

Our Smoking Cessation advice page goes through many of the benefits of going smoke free, but there are also several other websites online that can help you find what support is available in your area, as well as find useful hints, advice and tools to help you quit, such as at www.canstopsmoking.com.

It’s never too late to give up smoking, and the support is out there to help you once you’ve made that first step in deciding to quit.

If you would like to update the practice on your current smoking status, you can fill out our web form here.


No Smoking Day merged with the British Heart Foundation in 2011. The annual No Smoking Day campaign, which is now in its 30th year, inspires and helps smokers who want to quit, and is supported by an alliance of UK health bodies and charities. For more information about the No Smoking Day campaign visit www.nosmokingday.org.uk or for more on the BHF visit www.bhf.org.uk

Smokers can visit www.WeQuit.co.uk, an online hub full of information and tips on how to quit. It also includes a forum where people can chat with more than 15,000 other quitters about the issues they face.

A groundbreaking campaign starring Elaine C Smith launched last week to highlight the signs and symptoms of breast cancer.

The advert is the first in the UK to show real pictures of women’s breasts with visible signs of breast cancer. It features Scottish actress Elaine C Smith, who lost her own mum to breast cancer, holding a series of placards illustrating the symptoms of breast cancer.

The advert carries the message ‘Lumps aren’t the only sign of breast cancer’, so that women know how to spot the signs.

It is part of the Scottish Government’s £30 million Detect Cancer Early drive, which aims to increase the early detection of cancer by 25 per cent.

It follows an announcement last week that an additional £12 million is being invested in upgrading breast screening equipment across Scotland.

Breast screening saves 130 lives a year

To make sure you pick up any changes in your breasts, you need to be aware of what’s normal for you. Bear in mind, your breasts may look or feel different at different times of your life. But you need to know when things change, so you can spot potential problems.

The other thing you can do is make sure you go to regular screenings. Breast screening saves 130 lives in Scotland every year.

If you’re between 50 and 74, you’ll be invited for a mammogram every three years. This takes place at a screening unit in your local area. Women over 74 can refer themselves for screening via their GP, if they’re in any way concerned, but please remember, you still have to look out for any changes in between screenings

More information on Breast Screening at nhsinform.co.uk

Signs and Symptoms

Lumps
If you find a lump, it doesn’t necessarily mean you have cancer. But you need to get it looked at, to rule it out. Lumps can appear anywhere on your breasts, armpit or collarbone. Sometimes an area feels thicker or just different to the rest of your breasts.

Crusty nipples
Some women get crustiness around or on their nipple. Sometimes it takes the form of a red rash (a bit like eczema) and can be itchy.

Skin like orange peel
Some women’s breasts look red and become very sore. The skin looks like orange peel because the pores stand out in the inflamed area.

Turned-in nipples
Any changes in the size or shape of your breasts need to be checked out. One of the more noticeable changes is a nipple that, over time, becomes turned in.

Dimples
Some women find dimples on their breasts. These can appear anywhere and need to be checked out early.

Leaking nipples
If you notice a discharge coming from your nipple, you need to see a doctor as soon as possible. Sometimes it has blood in it, but not always.

More information on the signs and symptoms at nhsinform.co.uk

If you notice any changes at all, see your GP

We know that some women feel uncomfortable about seeing their doctor for this kind of thing. But your doctor is there to help you, and wants to see you. You’re not wasting anyone’s time.

If you’d prefer to see a female doctor, you can ask if there’s one available. Or you can ask for a female nurse to be present. You could take a friend along too, if you like. The important thing is you get checked.

For more information about this, and other forms of cancer, visit The Cancer Zone at nhsinform.co.uk.

Napier Merchiston Campus

It’s Freshers Week, and for students just starting out at Napier who need to register with a new GP surgery, Bruntsfield Medical Practice will be on hand at the Merchiston campus from Monday 10th to Wednesday 12th September, and then on Thursday 13th when we will be at the Fresher’s Fair at Craiglockhart.

Come find us and say hi to Liz and Harriet who will be manning our stall, and can answer your questions about the practice and give you the forms you need to register as a patient. You can also download the forms from this site and bring them in yourself to the practice. Our friendly reception staff are here to help you.

Remember, whether you fill in the forms then and there to hand over to the girls at the stall during Fresher’s week, or whether you bring them in yourself later on, you will need some form of identification to say you are who you say you are, and that you are a legitimate student at Napier. Especially if you have come from abroad to study in Edinburgh, as you will need an official letter saying you are a full-time student before you are entitled to NHS care for the length of your course.

It’s important, especially if you have any ongoing medical conditions, that you register with a GP, and our practice is here to help you with any health related questions you have. We hope you don’t need us, but we’re here for you if you do.

If severe weather strikes us again this year, as it did last year, are you prepared at home, on the road, and in your community?

It just takes a few simple steps to get ready for winter, with a good first step being to visit www.readyscotland.org.

They have lots of advice on how to prepare for, and deal with the effects of severe winter weather, and how to make a plan for your home, travel or business.

You can also be the first to find out about emergencies and receive alerts and advice by following their twitter and facebook accounts, or by subscribing to updates via email or sms.

Be safe and well this winter, and be ready.

Our attention has been brought to the following two alerts. Please be aware and act with caution if you are approached in the same way.

Bogus callers offering flu vaccination
An elderly patient in the Muirhouse area was approached in her home regarding her flu injection. When she said that she was going to get it done at the surgery, the person indicated that she could have it right there and then if she would prefer. The patient declined as they had no ID, and when advised that she would check with the surgery, the caller asked her not to. They left when the patient closed the door. The incident has been reported to the Police.

Practices have been asked to warn patients regarding this incident and advise that they contact the Police immediately if approached in this manner.

Scam by Company Specialising in Beds & Aids for Elderly and Infirm People – Relief Healthcare, Blantyre
A patient was approached by the above company who made an appointment. They allegedly specialise in beds and aids for the elderly and infirm. They apparently were aware that this particular patient had recently been in hospital, although the patient is not aware of how they got this information.

Napier Merchiston Campus

It’s Freshers Week, and for students just starting out at Napier who need to register with a new GP surgery, Bruntsfield Medical Practice will be on hand at the Merchiston campus from Monday 5th September to Friday 9th September, except for Thursday 8th when we will be at the Fresher’s Fair at Craiglockhart.

Come find us and say hi to Charlotte, Liz and Harriet who will be manning our stall, and can answer your questions about the practice and give you the forms you need to register as a patient. You can also download the forms from this site and bring them in yourself to the practice. Our friendly reception staff are here to help you.

Remember, whether you fill in the forms then and there to hand over to the girls at the stall during Fresher’s week, or whether you bring them in yourself later on, you will need some form of identification to say you are who you say you are, and that you are a legitimate student at Napier. Especially if you have come from abroad to study in Edinburgh, as you will need a letter saying you are a full-time student before you are entitled to NHS care for the length of your course.

It’s important, especially if you have any ongoing medical conditions, that you register with a GP, and our practice is here to help you with any health related questions you have. We hope you don’t need us, but we’re here for you if you do.

Message from the NHS Lothian Health Protection Team:

There has been a recent upsurge of measles cases in Lothian and the rest of the UK in children and younger adults. The cases are mainly associated with recent travel abroad, especially to France and other countries where there are ongoing outbreaks of measles at the moment.

Measles is a high infectious and dangerous illness which spreads easily in schools, universities, and summer camps. Those who are not fully immunised are most at risk.

Many children and families may be travelling outside Scotland on trips and family holidays this summer. If your child may have missed out on two doses of MMR vaccine when they were youngers, please consider getting your child immunised with MMR before you travel abroad during the summer break.

If you or a member of your family need an MMR vaccination, please make an appointment with one of our practice nurses.


Every other month or so, the practice will close on a Wednesday afternoon from 12.30pm for something called Protected Learning Time (PLT). These PLT afternoons occur Lothian wide, and are organised to allow practice staff to undergo training. These training sessions are sometimes organised centrally by NHS Lothian and include several practices together, and sometimes a practice will organise training just for their own staff.

On the afternoon of Wednesday 25th May 2011, one of our Practice Managers organised a training session with Mairi Howat, who is a Rehab & Mobility Worker with the Royal National Institute of Blind People.

There was a mixture of staff in attendance, including GPs, nurses, managers, secretarial and reception staff, all sitting round in the practice Health Education Room to listen to Mairi’s talk. The format was informal, and the tone was friendly and fun, but the topic was serious.


Mairi was an excellent speaker, with some great stories and anecdotes from her various clients during her years at RNIB. She also had a number of simple props with her such as blindfolds, and specially adapted goggles, to help demonstrate some of the more common eye problems that can cause vision loss, such as cataracts, macular degeneration, glaucoma and retinitis pigmentosa.

She challenged us to use our other senses, and to try to complete simple tasks like walking across the room and finding the door, while wearing the adapted eyewear, to show us how someone with a visual impairment can no longer take these everyday tasks for granted.

The feedback from the event was universally positive, and everyone came away more enlightened and a little more aware of some of the issues faced by blind and partially sighted people.

The RNIB have an excellent and informative website at www.rnib.org.uk that contains information on a range of eye conditions, including those mentioned in this article, as well as contact details for RNIB Scotland based on Hillside Crescent in Edinburgh.

If you feel that you are having problems with your vision, you should make an appointment with your usual GP to discuss your symptoms.

The next practice PLT afternoon is scheduled for Wednesday 31st August, but you can keep up to date on all practice closures and events on our Surgery Hours page.

Did you know, all veterans of MH Forces (including those who have served as reservists) can receive priority access to NHS primary, secondary and tertiary care for any conditions which are likely to be related to their service, even when they are not in receipt of a war pension. Though this is obviously subject to the clinical needs of all patients.

For new patients registering with the practice since April 2010, any service within HM Forces should be identified on the new patient registration form you completed, but if you joined the practice before that, and never officially made it known, you can do that now using the form below.

When you fill in and send in the information in the form below, it will be entered and flagged into your clinical record in such a way that means it will be included within any referrals for further care.

Your Name (required)
Your Date of Birth (required)
Your Email (include if you would like a copy of your details)
Date Enlisted:
Service/Personnel No.:
Any comments?

Please note: While we do everything possible within the practice to ensure your information is secure, this website is outwith the NHS Lothian network and no transmission over the Internet can be guaranteed to be 100% secure. Therefore, you provide us with your information at your own risk.

WHAT IS THE NHS MINOR AILMENT SERVICE?
Everyone can go to their pharmacist for advice or to buy a medicine for a minor illness or ailment. But this is an NHS service for people, including children, who didn’t pay prescription charges (prior to 1 April 2011). It means that if your pharmacist thinks you need it, they can give you a medicine on the NHS without you having to pay for it. It will also save you making an appointment with your GP simply to get a prescription.

WHO IS THE SERVICE FOR?
You can use the NHS Minor Ailment Service if:

  • you are registered with a GP surgery in Scotland, and
  • you disn’t pay for your prescriptions (prior to 1 April 2011), and
  • you don’t live in a nursing or residential care home

WHAT DOES THE SERVICE OFFER?
You will be able to get advice and free treatment from your community pharmacist for minor illnesses and ailments such as:

acne athlete’s foot
back ache cold sores
constipation cough
diarrhoea ear ache
eczema and allergies haemorrhoids (piles)
hay fever headache
head lice indigestion
mouth ulcers nasal congestion
pain period pain
thrush sore throat
threadworms warts and verrucae


If your pharmacist feels that it is better for you to see your GP then they may refer you directly or tell you to make an appointment with your GP.

HOW TO FIND OUT MORE
For more information about this service, including how to sign up, you can read the full leaflet (linked below) or talk to:

  • your local community pharmacy
  • your GP or another member of NHS staff involved in your care
  • the NHS Helpline on 0800 22 44 88 (calls are free)

Did you know?

The practice can conduct anywhere from three to four thousand separate consultations in a single month, and that doesn't count the increasing amount of telephone consulting we do.
© 2013 Bruntsfield Medical Practice Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha